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Elmore is first Astro to play all nine positions

Elmore is first Astro to play all nine positions

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Elmore is first Astro to play all nine positions

SEATTLE -- Call him the Jake of all Trades.

Astros infielder/outfielder/pitcher/catcher Jake Elmore became the first player in franchise history to play all nine positions in a season Tuesday when he saw time in center field in the ninth inning. The last Major Leaguers to play all nine positions in one season were Scott Sheldon and Shane Halter in 2000 -- who each accomplished the feat in one game.

Elmore is an infielder by trade who had seen time at the corner outfield positions this year. When he became the 14th player in history to catch and pitch in the same game, Aug. 19 at Texas, all that remained was center field.

"I knew I had eight," Elmore said. "Somebody brought it to my attention a couple of weeks ago. I thought it would be cool to get out there. The coaches caught wind of it, and we got the lead and they were like, 'Go make your debut in center.' It was really cool."

Astros manager Bo Porter said bench coach Eduardo Perez was the one who brought it to his attention that Elmore had yet to play center.

"Elmore goes out there to shag every day," Porter said. "He is a guy that can technically play all nine positions, and it was good for him to do that."

But Elmore has no illusions about becoming only the fifth player to play all nine positions in the same game.

"Obviously, that's something that puts you in a rare company," he said. "This is the Major Leagues. This isn't a stunt show. I certainly wouldn't expect or ask for it. It's not going to happen, let's put it that way."

Brian McTaggart is a reporter for MLB.com and writes an MLBlog, Tag's Lines. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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