Mistakes not lost in the shuffle following win

Mistakes not lost in the shuffle following win

Mistakes not lost in the shuffle following win

CHICAGO -- The fact the Astros were able to slug five home runs to beat the White Sox on Monday night didn't mean that manager Bo Porter wasn't going to talk to his players about the handful of mistakes they made during the game.

"You look at the number of mistakes we made and we were very fortunate to win that game," Porter said.

The Astros dropped a fly ball in the outfield that led to a run, threw to the wrong base that helped a runner score, had a runner picked off first base and allowed a run to score on a balk. Porter talked to his infielders and outfielders Tuesday about tightening the defense.

"Sometimes it's good you're able to overcome situations and that's probably a good time to address it because it's not actually after a defeat," Porter said. "You're able to point out the necessary things you cannot continue to do and think you're going to play winning baseball."

Porter said he was "completely surprised" when center fielder Brandon Barnes threw to the wrong base in the sixth inning. He threw to third on a Josh Phegley single to try to get Avisail Garcia, allowing Phegley to take second. Phegley then went to third on a balk and scored on a single.

Instead of having runners at first and third with one out, which would allow the infield to play at double-play depth, the White Sox had runners at second and third with one out and the infield was in.

"It's a very big play," Porter said. "With the infield in, the message was managing the game and making sure you're lined up properly. If you look at the ball that Brandon Barnes threw, if there's a cutoff man there, the ball doesn't go all the way to [Matt] Dominguez [at third]. It's a team concept and everybody has some place they have to be. When you're not in the right place, bad things happen."

Brian McTaggart is a reporter for MLB.com and writes an MLBlog, Tag's Lines. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.