Astros short hops

Astros short hops

ST. LOUIS -- The Astros got greedy in Game 2 at Busch Stadium and stole a game from the Cardinals.

Rookie Chris Burke again was the rally-starting catalyst for the Astros, going 2-for-4 with a triple and an RBI. Adam Everett also had a triple and drove in two runs.

Roy Oswalt pitched brilliantly for seven innings, allowing just one run on five hits while striking out six.

Closer Brad Lidge came in for the final two frames, striking out three and picking up the save.

Vitals check
A look at key statistics through Game 2 of the NLCS.

Team stats

Digits Trend The Deal
ERA 3.18 Oswalt and Lidge gave up just one run, dropping the team ERA from 5.62 to 3.18
BA .273 Up from .226 in Game 1
BA w/ RISP .063 Slightly better in Game 2
Runs 7 Scored when it mattered in Game 2
Errors 1 Astros had no errors in Game 1

Who's hot?

Player Digits Trend The Deal
Chris Burke .600 average (3-for-5), HR, three RBIs Came through in his first career postseason start in Game 2, with a triple and an RBI single, and has eight total bases in the series

Who's not?

Player Digits Trend The Deal
Morgan Ensberg 1-for-8 in the series Ensberg will need to produce more in the cleanup spot. In Game 2, he grounded into a double play, flew out twice and grounded out to the shortstop once

Behind the numbers
In his last two starts against the Cardinals, Oswalt has allowed two earned runs in 14 innings of work (1.29 ERA).

Frozen moment
After tripling, Burke scores the first run of the game on a passed ball in the second inning.

Second guess
Lidge pitched two innings instead of the one inning he typically does. Manager Phil Garner said Lidge was "well-rested and feeling good," and that he might pitch him for two innings if he is well-rested again.

Modern history
The Astros win snapped their six-game road losing streak in the NLCS. The franchise is 3-8 away from home in the NLCS.

Last word
"Oh, I'm just trying to get him through [Game 2]."
-- Garner, when asked if he was thinking about starting Burke on Saturday or whether the rookie might be more valuable off the bench

Stephen A. Norris is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.